Why was there a miners rebellion?

The rebellion was the culmination of a period of civil disobedience during the Victorian gold rush with miners objecting to the expense of a miner’s licence, taxation via the licence without representation, and the actions of the government, the police and military.

What were the miners rebelling against?

On 30 November 1854 miners from the Victorian town of Ballarat, disgruntled with the way the colonial government had been administering the goldfields, swore allegiance to the Southern Cross flag at Bakery Hill and built a stockade at the nearby Eureka diggings.

Why was the Eureka rebellion important?

The rebellion led to a fairer goldfields system with the licence replaced by the cheaper Miners Right, giving miners the right to vote. Many see this act as the first steps on the path to Australia’s democracy.

What did the miners feel unfair?

Unpopular with miners They complained it was too expensive and that it was unfair because it did not give them the right to buy property or vote. Many miners refused to buy a licence or could not afford one. The cost was the same regardless of whether a miner found any gold.

How were miners treated by police?

The miners felt this was an unfair system and were prepared to fight for change. Police invaded the mines to enforce the licensing laws, in late November 1854. The miners refused to cooperate, and burned their licences and stoned police.

What does the Eureka Flag stand for?

The Eureka Flag is historically significant as evidence of the growing movement agitating for fairness and universal democracy in 19th century Australia. The flag represents the oft mythologised notion of the Australian ‘fair go’ and the right of the individual over tyranny.

What happened to miners who didn’t have a licence?

Licences had to be carried at all times and there was very little leniency shown by police. Even if a miner had lost his licence, or it had been destroyed in dirty or wet working conditions, he could be fined or gaoled.

Why were the Victorian police so disliked?

People around the Victorian goldfields were also unhappy with the lack of thoroughness with which police had investigated a number of goldfields crimes. They were concerned about what they thought was the unfair and secretive way people were charged and convicted of crimes.

What happened on the day of the Eureka Stockade battle?

Before dawn on 3 December 1854, government troops stormed the diggers’ flimsy stockade at Eureka Lead, Ballarat. In a fiery battle that lasted only 20 minutes, more than 30 men were killed. Charged with high treason, the diggers’ leaders were all eventually acquitted.

What happened to the miners if they didn’t hold a licence?

As opposition grew many miners refused to buy a licence. Others simply could not afford one. Licences had to be carried at all times and there was very little leniency shown by police. Even if a miner had lost his licence, or it had been destroyed in dirty or wet working conditions, he could be fined or gaoled.

Why were the Chinese disliked on the goldfields?

Conflict between the Chinese and Europeans on the goldfields stemmed from the European miners’ resentment of these successes. This ongoing tension and resentment from the European gold miners came to a head in the Lambing Flat Riots, a series of violent anti-Chinese demonstrations in the Burrangong region of NSW.

What were the conditions of the miners licence?

Where was the rebellion of goldminers in 1854?

Eureka Stockade. 1854: Rebellion of goldminers at Eureka Stockade, Ballarat, Victoria. On 30 November 1854 miners from the Victorian town of Ballarat, disgruntled with the way the colonial government had been administering the goldfields, swore allegiance to the Southern Cross flag at Bakery Hill and built a stockade at the nearby Eureka diggings.

Why did the miners revolt in the Eureka Rebellion?

It seems the miners were very upset and angry about the licence system and they see it as a tax. In the year 1854, approximately 25,000 diggers were on the gold fields. During June, a Governor by the name of Hotham enforced the licence system law further.

How did the miners strike affect the public?

Other miners’ strikes in the 1970s had caused the public a lot of trouble, as there had been power cuts, but this time the government had prepared well. Some miners began returning to work from September, with many more returning by January as union pay ran out and some found it hard to pay for basic necessities.

When did the miners attack the reinforcements from Melbourne?

On 28 November 1854, the reinforcements marching from Melbourne were attacked by a crowd of miners. A number were injured.